Dental Crowns: Why You May Need a Root Canal First

Dental Crowns: Why You May Need a Root Canal FirstWhen you go to the dentist for dental crowns, you might learn that you need a root canal first.

It’s common for some people to need a root canal more than others. Depending on the severity of the tooth and the health of the jaw bone.

A root canal and a crown are considered separate procedures. You will usually have time to recover from the root canal before the crown is placed.

If you already have a crown in the mouth, then there is a greater chance that you’ll need a root canal at some point.

Most of the time, the dentist will try to do the root canal before dental crowns are place so that the bone and the nerves of the tooth are as healthy as possible.

A tooth that has a root canal before a crown has a higher success rate of lasting for several years compared to a tooth that is not treated.

Structural Damage

If you need a crown, then it usually means that there is an issue with the health of the tooth. Most crowns are placed when there is damage to the structure of the tooth, such as a break.

When the structure of the tooth is altered, it can sometimes impact the nerves. This is usually when a root canal is needed before the crown.

If there is any kind of damage to the crown after it’s placed or if the crown somehow comes off, then a root canal is usually performed to protect the health of the nerves and the remainder of the tooth if there is anything left.

You may not need a root canal if there hasn’t been any damage to the nerves or the components under the tooth.

This is the simplest way to look at what you’ll need.

• If there is any kind of breakage, then you’ll need a crown.
• If there has been damage to the areas under the tooth, then you’ll need a root canal first.

Tools Used for Dental Crowns

At times, the procedure of placing dental crowns might be too much for the nerves. A drill is used to remove most of the tooth as well as some of the pulp when a crown is placed.

When a drill is used, friction occurs, which can create pressure on the nerves under the tooth. This pressure often results in irritation.

Sometimes, letting the area heal for a few days allows the irritation to go away. If the impacts are severe, then a root canal will be performed before the process of placing the crown is completed.

At times, the chemicals that are used for the crown procedure could irritate the nerves.

Not All Teeth Are the Same

Each incident can result in damage or irritation to the nerve. However, that doesn’t mean that each tooth is the same.

Some people have stronger nerves than others, and there are some who might not need the intense work done before a crown that others would have.